Saturday, December 15, 2012

QuickPoint 2: Altruism Supports Coercion

...or "A Problem With Libertarianism"

Under altruism, (the morality of self-sacrifice,) an act of self-sacrifice can be good, even if the person sacrificing doesn't choose to do it.

If someone's interests are sacrificed by government force, the person committing an unwilling sacrifice doesn't get moral credit for the act, because it was unchosen. But the act itself can still be considered "good", apart from the choices of the "self" being sacrificed. A sacrifice is a sacrifice, regardless of whether it was freely chosen or imposed by a legal authority. Thus, under altruism, any sacrifice can be good, so long as it "benefits those in need."

In practice, the forced imposition of sacrifice is justified on dual grounds: it will benefit those in need, while simultaneously punishing those who violate morality by being selfish. Since everyone, according to the altruist morality, really should be self-sacrificial anyway, who can object to the overall project of forced charity? We can quibble about the practical details, say the altruists, but if we want a moral society, how can we leave the needy at the mercy of other individuals' choices?

Under the morality of altruism, the advocates of government coercion are right: A moral society requires forced charity, because without it, those who don't sacrifice for the welfare of others will be rewarded and encouraged, and those "noble altruists" who are in need will be "left at the mercy of the selfish."

The only way to fight this thinking is to fight for the morality of rational egoism, as established and advocated by Ayn Rand. For rational egoism, an act can only be good if it is freely chosen by the acting individual.

I highly recommend this book on how to fight for a free market: Free Market Revolution: How Ayn Rand's Ideas Can End Big Government.


Related Posts:

Atlas Shrugged, Altruism and Egoism

 The Morality of Rational Egoism: Short Notes

Link Highlight: Introduction to Objectivism Playlist